In Deep in their roots, all flowers keep the light visual metaphors are beautifully woven together, addressing challenging concepts such as the silence and despair surrounding the tragic death of a beloved sibling, especially when compounded by the horror of murder and violation. Anna D’Addario works through the intensity of extreme personal loss and family trauma, to create a unique elegy to her sister Daniela. This kind of practice requires a healthy amount of courage and psychological stamina on behalf of the artist, as she opens herself up, not only to her own raw, painful feelings, but to the potential of viewers’ morbid curiosity, fear, sympathy and a myriad of unexpected responses.


About Artist

Anna Maria Antoinette D’Addario is an Italian-Australian photographic artist and writer who explores diverse forms of storytelling, combining traditional documentary modes with photographic art practice. She is dedicated to the expression of social, environmental, and humanitarian issues. Her current work revolves around the investigation and resurrection of memory and the traces left behind in people and place.

Anna exhibits regularly and her work is part of various private and public collections such as the National Library of Australia, the State Library of NSW, the State Libraries of Rome and Florence and the Piccolomini Library in Siena. She is a regular contributor to The New York Times and her work has been produced broadly in publications such as The New York Times Magazine, The Guardian, Vogue Italia, Internazionale, The Sydney Morning Herald and Il Sole 24 Ore amongst others. She is a member of Women Photograph and part of their database; a chapter lead for Women Photograph Sydney and a founding member of Lumina Collective. Anna is a MFA Graduate from Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney.


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Deep in their roots, all flowers keep the light
Anna Maria Antoinette D’Addario

Publisher
ceiba editions
2019

Design
Eva-Maria Kunz, Anna Maria Antoinette D’Addario

106 pages
23.3cm x 16cm

Edition of 350