We are often lost upon arrival. Landmarks that attract us from a distance dissolve as we move towards them, akin to the way a face blurs and fractures into our periphery as we approach for a kiss. The conspicuousness of objects in a landscape serve as a guide pointing us in the direction of our course. The landscape perpetually disappears, moves away, overwhelms. One never really arrives. The memory of that perpetual moment is built upon, subtracted from, layered, manipulated, (re)lived and remembered over the years. In order to elucidate this notion, senses that may have been extinguished through the process of arriving are (re)kindled through the tenderness of change.

Memory tangles itself, it overlaps and forms a language of its own; its notion resists articulation and is inconceivable and placeless. A single frame is inadequate to (re)present the invisibility of emotions, especially when photography deals with what is visible. The fragmentation of photographs dissolves the objective form into a subjective experience. This act of deconstruction aims to pull apart and question our reality. We cannot go back in time, but we can return to the landscape in our memories; that is all we can possess, which in fact possesses us.


About Artist

Jonathan Liu (b. 1993, Singapore) is a Visual Artist working primarily with photography within his practice. He is interested in the narratives formed through text and photographs. Drawn from his fascination of narratives and the relationship between the artist and the poet, his recent works attempt to mirror and question our reality through representation and fragmentation of the landscape. His work deals with concepts such as memory, post-memory and the search for the layers in-between with works having exhibited in the United Kingdom, China and Singapore. He graduated from London College of Communication with a Degree in Photography and is currently teaching in LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore.


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